Fort Myers Girl Scouts Branch Out for a Good Cause

61410909_10213204889667904_7486061957510856704_n.jpgGirl Scouts of Troop 226 led the way for OneTree’s inaugural tree planting at Lakes Park in Fort Myers on Friday, May 31. Using hard-earned cookie program proceeds, local troops purchased native trees at $17 a pop, flowering Florida-friendly trees for $25 each, and heirloom trees at $140 a piece for their community project, and were on site planting, digging, mulching, and watering.

Header Image.jpgSixty-seven native and flowering trees, including African Tulips and Queens Crape Myrtle, can now be seen near the botanical gardens at Lakes Park. Twenty years from now, guests who walk this path will see a gorgeous horizon of flowering trees. Girls even painted and tucked away rocks in the mulch to surprise park-goers.

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Special shout-out to Troops 226, 746, 292, 195, 709, 153, 673, 245, 463, 462, 468, 768, 124, and 654 for sponsoring and planting trees at this special event. All the trees have been tagged with the tree’s scientific and common name, and sponsoring troop number. Each girl will receive a certificate and the GPS coordinates of their tree so they can come back years from now and always know which tree is theirs.

 

“Planting trees made me feel happy because I knew I was giving back to my community and the planet.” Haley V., Age 7, Fort Myers

“I feel happy that girls can have a big idea about helping the earth, but don’t have to wait until they get big to do it.”  Audrey R., Age 7,  Fort Myers

Alongside OneTree, these girls are truly leaving a legacy for future generations and creating a healthier planet for everyone. In an effort to fight deforestation and urban sprawl, OneTree has made it their mission to try and replace as many trees as humanly possible. This is a perfect match because Girl Scouts have made it their mission to make the world a better place.

Check out OneTree reporting live before and after the event.

 

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Sarasota Girl Scout Gives the Autism House a Makeover

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Sarasota County resident and Suncoast Polytechnical High School graduate Emily Cruce earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Tranquil Hands and Paws.

When Emily heard that the Autism House in Sarasota didn’t have the time or funds for a much-needed landscaping makeover, she went above and beyond their expectations. Her team completely overhauled the dangerous backyard and transformed it into a safe and peaceful space for autistic children and their families. Emily also provided leashes, collars, toys, bowls, and treats for the support dogs in their program. Complete with a life-size Zen garden, benches, and dog topiaries—this is paradise.

“I discovered a strong sense of self because I am now confident in my ability to start and finish something when my heart is in it.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Emily!

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Bradenton Girl Scout Advocates Against Balloon Releases

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Manatee County resident and Saint Stephen’s Episcopal School student Emma Craig earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Balloons Don’t Go to Heaven.

Balloon releases are common for remembering lost loved ones or celebrating special occasions, but are extremely harmful to the environment and wildlife. Emma created a documentary, including interviews with local experts, to inform her community about balloon releases, their negative impact, and alternative solutions. Emma went on a tour of speaking engagements and even landed the opportunity to present at the international Water is Life Conference in 2020.

“A leader does not give up. Even when things did not go my way or I felt frustrated, I never gave up.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Emma!

Port Charlotte Girl Scout Destigmatizes Sexual Assault

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Charlotte County resident and Lemon Bay High School graduate Bailey Chamberlain earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Let’s Talk About It.

Bailey wanted to give a voice to children of all ages who have experienced sexual assault and educate the school system about the signs of sexual assault, safety tips, and where to get help. She passed a proclamation through the Charlotte County Board of Commissioners stating that one week each school year will be devoted to educating students and staff about sexual violence, which Bailey has arranged to be delivered by the Center For Abuse & Rape Emergencies.

“You have to speak up and give others the courage to speak up as well. I want to be a leader that will do something and make the world a better place.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Bailey!

I Look Forward to What the Future Holds

Written by: Victoria M., Guest Blogger

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I joined Girl Scouts as a Cadette while in 7th grade. I went to a recruiting event and the one thing that stood out to me the most was a line from our Girl Scout Law, “Make the world a better place.” I wanted to join Girl Scouts to help improve my community while having fun and making new friends. I was excited yet nervous when my mother told me I would be attending my first Girl Scout meeting. It took me a while to open up but I was very happy when it happened. 

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As a Girl Scout I’ve had some amazing opportunities to do things that otherwise I might not have been able to do. I went on an urban backpacking trip to Baltimore where we did service projects to help the community. We did things like plant trees, help rebuild a park, serve food at a soup kitchen, meet the mayor of Baltimore, and even tour Washington D.C., which included visits to the Holocaust Museum, Lincoln Memorial, and Washington Monument.

9 As a Media Marvel, I learned how media affects our everyday lives and the ins and outs of the media world. Additionally, I’ve had the opportunity to meet and work with some of our women veterans; take part in various media opportunities, like making a video and being a photographer; and attend special events like Little Black Dress and Women in Business’s SMARTgirl.

I am a Counselor in Training (CIT). Through CIT weekend, I’ve acquired leadership skills to help mentor younger Girls Scouts and run programs while at camp. All of the CITs, myself included, are First Aid, CPR, and AED-certified. I am also a certified lifeguard thanks to Girl Scouts. I love not only attending camp, but also helping as a CIT whenever possible. 19

I am also part of the Junior Sales Specialist team. We help run the shop in Sarasota and traveling shops. We open and close the store, put out merchandise, restock, recover, set up and break down the traveling shops, assist customers and work the register, all while having fun and learning at the same time.

23The Girl Scout Cookie Program has taught me, and others like me, how to be more confident, hone my people skills, practice business ethics, manage money, and set goals. In addition to helping me have more confidence and treat the world with kindness, Girl Scouting has given me many other invaluable skills and experiences that I will take with me into adulthood.

I have made great friendships that will last a lifetime but most importantly, I have gained a second family.

I have loved every minute of being a Girl Scout. I want to thank all of my troop leaders, council members, and the Girl Scout Movement for helping me become who I am today. I look forward to what the future holds.

 

North Port Girl Scout Promotes Peace

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Sarasota County resident and Pine View School graduate Bianca Carey earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled PeaceJam.

PeaceJam is an international organization empowering youth to create positive change in their communities. Compelled by their mission, Bianca decided to establish a PeaceJam club at Sarasota Suncoast Academy, a local middle school. She designs and delivers the curriculum at their meetings. Her club has celebrated UN Human Rights Day, started a random-acts-of-kindness initiative, collected donations that Bianca hand delivered to Panama, and planned a Day Without Hate event.

“Thanks to my Gold Award, I am happy to say that I, along with the students, have mastered the art of brainstorming and developing an action plan.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Bianca!

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These Heroes Don’t Wear Capes…They Wear Girl Scout Vests

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Now, as hurricane season approaches, you can turn to your local Girl Scout for advice, proper protocol, and of course, a friendly hand. This is all thanks to Hurricane Heroes, a program developed and executed by two incredible Girl Scout volunteers—Erika Rolando and Nicole Knapp.

On Saturday, June 1, which just so happens to be the first day of hurricane season, over 150 Girl Scouts convened at Camp Honi Hanta to participate in activities like sandbagging, mock window boarding, creating an emergency kit for their families, learning basic pet first aid, and witnessing a virtual hurricane.

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Guest speakers from the Sarasota Bradenton International Airport, Manatee County Emergency Management, Manatee County Emergency Medical Services, and Manatee County Public Works led the discussion about evacuating versus staying during a storm threat.

With their new skills and knowledge, these girls can help prepare for storm season, while being an educated part of the conversation when their family discusses their options.

Erika Rolando said it best, “During a natural disaster, you’re trying to help your neighbors and you’re trying to help other people, so the more hands the better. It’s a community effort—the more you know, the more you grow and the more people you can help.”

See the full album of pictures here.

Read the news article from Herald-Tribune here.

We would like to show our appreciation to the following:

  • Manatee County Emergency Management
  • Manatee County Emergency Medical Services
  • Manatee County Public Works
  • Sarasota Bradenton International Airport
  • Pittsburgh Pirates/Bradenton Marauders
  • Mission BBQ
  • Bayshore Animal Hospital
  • Manatee Memorial Hospital
  • Lowe’s
  • Publix
  • Women of the Moose
  • Manatee Apparel