BIG NEWS: 42 New Girl Scout Badges to Change the World

Say hello to 42 NEW Girl Scout badges and one NEW Journey exclusively for girls ages 5–18!

Excited?! The new badges and badge requirements are available in the Girl Scout Shop.

The new programming allows girls to make their own choices about how they want to experience and influence the world while preparing them to address some of society’s most pressing needs through hands-on learning and real-life problem-solving in cybersecurity, coding, space exploration, and citizen science. But wait, there’s more! For the first time ever, girls can choose between two ways of earning their Outdoor badges—it’s an adventure seeker’s dream come true!

Giving girls choices is important for developing their sense of self, their own voice, and gender equality: research from the World Bank Group shows that increasing women’s agency and decision-making abilities is key to improving their lives, communities, and the world. Additionally, Girl Scouts are more likely than other girls to take an active role in decision making (80% vs. 51%).

You’re invited to the blaze-your-own-trail adventure. We hope you love it as much as we do!

The new programming for girls in grades 6–12 includes:

  • Nine Cybersecurity badges,created in partnership with Palo Alto Networks, through which girls learn about the inner workings of computer technology and cybersecurity and apply concepts of safety and protection to the technology they use every day. Activities range from decrypting and encrypting messages, to learning proper protection methods for devices, to exploring real-world hacking scenarios (funded by Palo Alto Networks).
  • Think Like a Citizen Scientist, a Girl Scout Leadership Journey during which girls participate in interactive activities to practice observation techniques; collect data; and share their findings with real-world scientists through an online network. As with all of Girl Scouts’ Leadership Journeys, girls use their newly honed skills to take action on a community issue of their choosing (funded by Johnson & Johnson and The Coca-Cola Foundation).
  • To prepare girls in grades 6–12 to pursue computer science careers, Girl Scouts will launch the organization’s first Cyber Challenge events in select areas this fall. At these events, which will take place October 19, girls will learn crucial cybersecurity skills by completing challenges such as running traceroutes and identifying phishing schemes (funded by Raytheon).

With the new release, all Girl Scouts in grades K–12 will have the opportunity to earn their Cybersecurity and Space Science badges, as well as complete the Think Like Citizen Scientist Journey.

The new programming for girls in grades K–12 includes:

  • 12 Outdoor High Adventure badges, designed for girls to explore nature and experience exciting outdoor adventures like backpacking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, rock climbing, and tree climbing—giving them the confidence to support one another, take healthy risks, and spend dedicated time in nature. These are the first Girl Scout badges that members can earn by choosing one of two self-directed paths (funded by The North Face).
  • 18 Coding for Good badges, which not only teach girls the basics of coding but also detail how every stage of the coding process provides girls with opportunities to use their skills for good. Girls will learn about algorithms through age-appropriate, creative activities, such as coding positive memes to spread a message about a cause they care about, designing a digital game to educate people about an issue, and developing an app to promote healthy habits. Every Coding for Good badge includes a plugged-in and unplugged version, so that all girls can learn the foundations of coding, regardless of their access to technology (funded by AT&T and Dell).
“Girl Scouts has ignited the power and potential of girls for over a century, and we are committed to ensuring that today’s girls are the future of American leadership,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “Girl Scouts is where girls can explore new subjects, discover their passions, learn to take smart risks, and become their best, most confident selves—whether they want to become a NASA astronaut, an entrepreneur, a rock climber, a coder, or a cybersecurity agent.”

GSUSA works with top organizations in fields that interest today’s girls. Combined with Girl Scouts’ expertise in girl leadership, these organizations and specialists advise and weigh in on content to provide the most cutting-edge programming available to girls. Content collaborators include codeSpark, the National Integrated Cyber Education Research Center (NICERC), SciStarter, and Vidcode. In true girl-led fashion, girls also tested the new offerings.

There’s just no doubt about it: Girl Scouts is the single BEST place for girls. Delivering a one-of-a-kind leadership development program (and the largest in the world for girls!), Girl Scouts provides girls with unlimited girl-led adventures found nowhere else.

Not a Girl Scout yet? No problem! Troops are forming now—join Girl Scouts today.

 

Source: BIG NEWS: 42 New Girl Scout Badges to Change the World

Fort Myers Girl Scout Turned her Passion into Purpose Through Film

samantha-romero2.jpg

Lee County resident and Bishop Verot High School graduate Samantha Romero earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled The Video Students’ Journey.

Addressing the limited availability of video production education, Samantha created a video club at Bishop Verot High School. Through in-person workshops and online video classes she trained younger students in the art of film, editing, and techniques to create professional content. Samantha’s passion led her to Panama City in the fall of 2018 to document Hurricane Michael’s destruction of St. John Catholic School. Through the power of video, she was able to help the school share their story and spearhead their relief effort.

“In the future, I will continue this leadership fueled by Gold Award, by guiding my peers to continue to help others in need.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Samantha!

Naples Girl Scout Saved the Bees

hayley-reid3.jpg

Collier County resident and Naples High School graduate Hayley Reid earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Save the Bees.

Determined to promote the preservation of bees and bee habitats, Hayley built bee houses and spread awareness of the issue throughout her community. Using fallen trees from Hurricane Irma she constructed and installed bee houses, along with educational posters, in her neighborhood and in other public spaces. Hayley immediately recorded bee activity in her artificial habitats and hopes her project will combat the declining bee population for years to come.

“I learned a lot about myself and my community through my Gold Award. My community is very encouraging and willing to help, especially for environmental issues.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Hayley!

Bradenton Girl Scout Created Confidence Through Crochet

cypress-potter1.jpg

Manatee County resident and Lakewood Ranch High School graduate Cypress Potter earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Baskets for the Brain.

Cypress’s project helped senior citizens at The Sheridan at Lakewood Ranch assisted living facility relearn fine motor skills, discover a creative outlet, and experience positive social interaction. In a workshop setting, she taught a crochet pattern to the residents that resulted in a bag that could be adapted to hang on either a wheelchair or walker. Not only did the crocheting improve the residents’ dexterity and sharpen their minds, Cypress noted the bags allowed them to gain a newfound feeling of accomplishment and self-worth.

“I know now, as a result of my project, that I can address social issues that I never anticipated were part of my interests.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Cypress!

Fort Myers Girl Scout Fights the Pollination Crisis

katie-poinsett2.jpg

Lee County resident and Estero High School graduate Katie Poinsett earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Planting for Pollinators.

For her Gold Award, Katie built and planted flower beds within the Lakes Park Children’s Garden. She researched which plants would best attract pollinators and installed signs to educate guests about bees and butterflies and their role in our ecosystem. Katie also had a proclamation passed in Lee County declaring March 1 as Planting for Pollinators Day. To unveil her pollination station, Katie hosted a family event that culminated with a butterfly release.

“This project has encouraged me to go outside my comfort zone, which will help me be a successful leader. I believe that my Gold Award has given me a solid foundation for my future.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Katie!

8 Points Troop 150 Wants to Share about Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary

header photo.PNG

  1. Troop 150 has a special love for animals.
  2. They believe in the mission of Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary, which cares for retired zoo animals, abused wildlife, and other animals that cannot survive alone in the wild.
  3. Troop 150 chose to support Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary in Punta Gorda for their 2019 Take Action project.
  4. As a surprise to the Octagon staff, the girls spent $150 of their cookie program proceeds to purchase a Home Depot gift card, shovel, rake, and yard sprayer to help take care of the animals.
  5. Each one of the girls in Troop 150 shared information with their individual classrooms, urging others to visit and support the organization.
  6. Subsequently, one classroom researched all of the animals at Octagon, presented their research to their parents, and raised an additional $100 to donate to the cause!
  7. Troop 150 urges everyone to visit Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary and see the good work done there.
  8. The girls of Troop 150 filmed a video to spread the word about Octagon and why it’s so important to them.

Fort Myers Girl Scout Stays Buzzy Educating About Pollinators

Emily Mayo

Lee County resident and South Fort Myers High School student Emily Mayo earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Power to Pollinators.

Concerned with the population decline of pollinators like bees and butterflies, Emily took to the classroom to educate 4-6 year-olds about the issue and how they can help. Her lesson plan includes two hands-on activities, an activity booklet to share with a trusted adult, and a pollinator-friendly plant to take home. Emily displayed her project at Florida Gulf Coast University and submitted an article to The Neighborhood Gardener to share with the community the work she was doing to protect pollinators.

“I like to take action and do something to solve a problem. Making a difference in my community is an important part of making a difference in the world.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Emily!