Bradenton Girl Scout Created Confidence Through Crochet

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Manatee County resident and Lakewood Ranch High School graduate Cypress Potter earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Baskets for the Brain.

Cypress’s project helped senior citizens at The Sheridan at Lakewood Ranch assisted living facility relearn fine motor skills, discover a creative outlet, and experience positive social interaction. In a workshop setting, she taught a crochet pattern to the residents that resulted in a bag that could be adapted to hang on either a wheelchair or walker. Not only did the crocheting improve the residents’ dexterity and sharpen their minds, Cypress noted the bags allowed them to gain a newfound feeling of accomplishment and self-worth.

“I know now, as a result of my project, that I can address social issues that I never anticipated were part of my interests.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Cypress!

Fort Myers Girl Scout Fights the Pollination Crisis

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Lee County resident and Estero High School graduate Katie Poinsett earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Planting for Pollinators.

For her Gold Award, Katie built and planted flower beds within the Lakes Park Children’s Garden. She researched which plants would best attract pollinators and installed signs to educate guests about bees and butterflies and their role in our ecosystem. Katie also had a proclamation passed in Lee County declaring March 1 as Planting for Pollinators Day. To unveil her pollination station, Katie hosted a family event that culminated with a butterfly release.

“This project has encouraged me to go outside my comfort zone, which will help me be a successful leader. I believe that my Gold Award has given me a solid foundation for my future.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Katie!

8 Points Troop 150 Wants to Share about Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary

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  1. Troop 150 has a special love for animals.
  2. They believe in the mission of Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary, which cares for retired zoo animals, abused wildlife, and other animals that cannot survive alone in the wild.
  3. Troop 150 chose to support Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary in Punta Gorda for their 2019 Take Action project.
  4. As a surprise to the Octagon staff, the girls spent $150 of their cookie program proceeds to purchase a Home Depot gift card, shovel, rake, and yard sprayer to help take care of the animals.
  5. Each one of the girls in Troop 150 shared information with their individual classrooms, urging others to visit and support the organization.
  6. Subsequently, one classroom researched all of the animals at Octagon, presented their research to their parents, and raised an additional $100 to donate to the cause!
  7. Troop 150 urges everyone to visit Octagon Wildlife Sanctuary and see the good work done there.
  8. The girls of Troop 150 filmed a video to spread the word about Octagon and why it’s so important to them.

Fort Myers Girl Scout Stays Buzzy Educating About Pollinators

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Lee County resident and South Fort Myers High School student Emily Mayo earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Power to Pollinators.

Concerned with the population decline of pollinators like bees and butterflies, Emily took to the classroom to educate 4-6 year-olds about the issue and how they can help. Her lesson plan includes two hands-on activities, an activity booklet to share with a trusted adult, and a pollinator-friendly plant to take home. Emily displayed her project at Florida Gulf Coast University and submitted an article to The Neighborhood Gardener to share with the community the work she was doing to protect pollinators.

“I like to take action and do something to solve a problem. Making a difference in my community is an important part of making a difference in the world.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Emily!

Bradenton Girl Scout Encourages Kids to Spend Time Outdoors

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Manatee County resident and Braden River High School graduate Ashley Manevitch earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled The Great Outdoors.

Children all over the world are spending less time outdoors and more time behind screens. Ashley created an activity booklet and teddy bear combo that creatively encourages children and their parents to spend time outside. Through her project, she has found families are healthier, happier, and more in touch with their natural surroundings. Ashley connected with a local day care provider who continues to share the activity booklets and teddy bears.

“Now I believe in my ability to lead a group, creatively problem solve, and think on my feet to achieve my goals.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Ashley!

Punta Gorda Girl Scout Aims to Retain Young Talent in Charlotte

Megan KeatingCharlotte County resident and Florida SouthWestern Collegiate High School – Charlotte Campus graduate Megan Keating earned Girl Scouting’s highest honor—the Gold Award—with her project titled Charlotte Connection.

Eager to uncover what her hometown has to offer, Megan designed a website to showcase the careers and opportunities available in Charlotte County. She coordinated interviews with community members, including the mayor, sheriff, police chief, and librarian, to get insight on their day-to-day work. Megan’s goal is to excite and retain young talent who would be entering the job force soon and bring a sense of connection back to the Charlotte area.

“My Gold Award has skyrocketed me into success and determination. I’ve learned that I’m capable of so much, even in a short amount of time.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award, open to high school Girl Scouts, recognizes girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through take-action projects with sustainable impact in their communities. The Gold Award is so prestigious that some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Congratulations, Megan!

Fort Myers Girl Scouts Branch Out for a Good Cause

61410909_10213204889667904_7486061957510856704_n.jpgGirl Scouts of Troop 226 led the way for OneTree’s inaugural tree planting at Lakes Park in Fort Myers on Friday, May 31. Using hard-earned cookie program proceeds, local troops purchased native trees at $17 a pop, flowering Florida-friendly trees for $25 each, and heirloom trees at $140 a piece for their community project, and were on site planting, digging, mulching, and watering.

Header Image.jpgSixty-seven native and flowering trees, including African Tulips and Queens Crape Myrtle, can now be seen near the botanical gardens at Lakes Park. Twenty years from now, guests who walk this path will see a gorgeous horizon of flowering trees. Girls even painted and tucked away rocks in the mulch to surprise park-goers.

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Special shout-out to Troops 226, 746, 292, 195, 709, 153, 673, 245, 463, 462, 468, 768, 124, and 654 for sponsoring and planting trees at this special event. All the trees have been tagged with the tree’s scientific and common name, and sponsoring troop number. Each girl will receive a certificate and the GPS coordinates of their tree so they can come back years from now and always know which tree is theirs.

 

“Planting trees made me feel happy because I knew I was giving back to my community and the planet.” Haley V., Age 7, Fort Myers

“I feel happy that girls can have a big idea about helping the earth, but don’t have to wait until they get big to do it.”  Audrey R., Age 7,  Fort Myers

Alongside OneTree, these girls are truly leaving a legacy for future generations and creating a healthier planet for everyone. In an effort to fight deforestation and urban sprawl, OneTree has made it their mission to try and replace as many trees as humanly possible. This is a perfect match because Girl Scouts have made it their mission to make the world a better place.

Check out OneTree reporting live before and after the event.

 

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